Tommy Lasorda on bringing back Dodgers glory

RANCHO CUCAMONGA, Calif. -- Tommy Lasorda wants to celebrate come October.

The Hall of Fame manager has waited 25 years since he saw his beloved Dodgers spray the World Series champagne and host a championship parade for the city of Los Angeles.

Worse yet, Lasorda has seen the rival Giants win a pair of titles in the last three seasons.

"That's enough," the Dodgers legend proclaimed from the Rancho Cucamonga third-base dugout, where he managed a Dodgers split squad against the Quakes -- the club's Class A affiliate. "We've got to start celebrating again."

If there was ever a year, Lasorda says 2013 is the one. He's impressed with the roster, he's impressed with the coaching staff, and he's impressed with the new management.

"That didn't happen before -- to go this long [without winning a World Series]," Lasorda said. "When I managed, the first five years, we were in three World Series.

"But we've got the opportunity. We've got the players, we've got the people who purchased the club behind this ballclub. They've showed that they put their money where their mouth is. They want to win just as bad as I want to win."

The 85-year-old Lasorda was honored by the Quakes in a pregame ceremony hosted by Rancho Cucamonga Mayor L. Dennis Michael. The renovated home dugout at the Rancho Cucamonga Epicenter was also named in Lasorda's honor.

Lasorda's current role with the club centers on evaluating and teaching Minor Leaguers. He sees a bright future for the organization -- one he hopes includes another title soon.

"I hope it happens before the big Dodger in the sky calls me," Lasorda quipped.

Dodgers yet to name replacement for Hanley

ITA@MEX: Cruz gives Mexico the lead with RBI double

ANAHEIM -- As the Dodgers prepare for Opening Day on Monday, manager Don Mattingly's biggest concern is the left side of the infield.

With shortstop Hanley Ramirez sidelined due to a torn ligament in his left thumb, the Dodgers are still finalizing plans on how to replace the three-time All-Star. Luis Cruz is the likely candidate to start at shortstop, but Mattingly would not commit to that Thursday.

"What we do over there is a concern," Mattingly said before Thursday's exhibition against the Angels. "We'll see. Once Hanley was out of the equation there, it put us in a situation depending on what we do with Luis."

Before Ramirez's injury, Cruz projected as the starting third baseman.

"If we move Luis over to shortstop, then that leaves a number of guys available to play third base," Mattingly said. "If I do that, then it will be a combination of guys, between Jerry [Hairston], [Nick] Punto and Juan [Uribe]."

Mattingly added the club was "still looking at different options" at shortstop. The manager mentioned that Punto played the position well during Spring Training.

Cruz has 63 appearances at shortstop in his four-year career, including 23 with the Dodgers in 2012.

Justin Sellers is back in the mix at shortstop, despite being optioned to the Minor Leagues last week. He started at short the last two days.

Ryu finishes on high note, ready to make debut

LAD@LAA: Ryu perfect through four in start vs. Angels

ANAHEIM -- Dodgers rookie starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu finished Spring Training much better than he started.

Ryu retired all 12 batters he faced in Thursday's 3-0 exhibition win against the Angels. It was the Korean lefty's final outing before his scheduled start against the Giants on Tuesday, the second game of the season.

"I'm happy that I ended camp on a good note," Ryu said through a translator. "It's a good crossover to the regular season."

Despite appearing out of shape at the start of camp, Ryu finished Spring Training with a 3.29 ERA. In seven appearances, including six starts, he struck out 27 in 27 1/3 innings.

Ryu admitted he will be nervous before making his regular-season debut Tuesday, but added he's physically prepared.

"All my pitches are pretty up to normal now, I feel comfortable," Ryu said. "I feel the same way before the Korean season starts."

Dodgers manager Don Mattingly likes what he's seen so far from the southpaw.

"He's thrown the ball great all camp," Mattingly said. "Obviously coming in, we have no idea what to expect other than seeing him on tape and knowing he was the best pitcher in Korea. I think he's shown that he can pitch at this level, at least during Spring Training he has. The season can be a different scenario."

In December, Ryu signed with Los Angeles for six years and $36 million.

Mattingly said the club likes Ryu's ability to locate his fastball, utilize his changeup and add velocity whenever he wants.

"He's shown a real feel for pitching," the manager said. "If you can do that, we feel like he's going to be tough. He's been consistent, as consistent as anyone we had in camp."

Lilly, Capuano, Harang could be headed to 'pen

Harang, League impressed by Dodgers' talented lineup

ANAHEIM -- The Dodgers have an overflow of starting pitchers, and some could end up in the bullpen by Opening Day on Monday.

Ted Lilly, Chris Capuano and Aaron Harang are the candidates to move from a starting role to the 'pen.

Lilly said Wednesday he'd prefer to pitch out of the bullpen rather than on a Minor League rehab assignment to rebuild arm strength. Capuano prefers a starting role, though Los Angeles appears inclined to send him to the 'pen. Harang also wants to remain a starter.

Manager Don Mattingly did not divulge much of the club's plans for the trio of pitchers before Thursday's exhibition against the Angels.

"Well, we haven't announced any of it, so it's hard to say," Mattingly said. "But I'm saying you're going to find some of them out in part of our bullpen. Guys will end up pitching out of our 'pen, we just haven't finalized that because you never really know what's going to happen in the last couple of days of Spring Training. At this point, we have a pretty good feel and we'll make decisions going forward."

The Dodgers could trade Harang or Capuano before the season. Seattle, Pittsburgh and Cleveland have scouted both pitchers.