NEW YORK -- The last-place Marlins remain exceptionally banged up, playing with a limited bench -- even with September callups -- as Justin Ruggiano continues to nurse an injured right shoulder and Giancarlo Stanton a sore left intercostal muscle.

Ruggiano left Friday night's game with a right shoulder sprain after diving for a ball hit by New York's Scott Hairston in the fifth inning. He said he wasn't expecting to have an MRI, but it would probably be 24-48 hours before he resumed baseball activities.

"Until it calms down, I won't really know what I'm capable of doing," Ruggiano said.

To add depth to a beleaguered lineup, the Marlins called up outfielder Scott Cousins on Saturday. The team is also likely without Austin Kearns (back) and Giancarlo Stanton (oblique), leaving manager Ozzie Guillen with a thin bench for the weekend series.

For Saturday, Cousins and catcher Rob Brantly were likely the only available bats off the bench, with no right-handed hitters available.

Stanton has been out since Sunday after tweaking his side while sliding in last weekend's series against the Reds. He figures to be back before season's end, but hasn't recovered in the way he had hoped.

"Earlier it was everything, but throwing was better and running was better," Stanton said. "So there was a little progress, but hitting was the main thing."

Marlins aren't expected to shake up front office

NEW YORK -- If changes are indeed on the way for the Marlins, it doesn't appear they will be in the front office.

MLB.com on Saturday confirmed reports in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and Miami Herald that Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria is not expected to make drastic front-office changes.

However, the status of manager Ozzie Guillen and his staff remains undetermined.

The Marlins have been engulfed in a firestorm of speculation since Thursday, when the team left Miami for New York. USA Today reported that president of baseball operations Larry Beinfest would be dismissed, perhaps as early as next week. The report added that Dan Jennings -- the team's vice president of player personnel -- would replace Beinfest.

Marlins president David Samson told reporters that the team will not respond to rumors or reports.

But there has been growing speculation that Guillen's job is on the line. Throughout the difficult season, Guillen has accepted his share of the blame. He also added that he and his staff "let those [front-office] guys down."

Until any announcements are made, the Marlins are bracing for more rumors and reports. Ultimately, Loria will decide which direction the team is headed in 2013.

"I don't fire anybody," Guillen said. "Loria's the one who's gonna do it. I make people get fired. The thing about this group, we all failed, and we're all responsible for this.

"We all thought it was gonna be better for us. It wasn't. We might have picked the wrong guys, we might have picked the wrong team, we might have spent money on the wrong people. Just name it."

The Marlins had hoped to challenge for the playoffs. But they are on their final road trip trying to move out of last place in the National League East.

"What went wrong?" Guillen said. "Everything. I've never seen a team lose in more different ways than the way we lose. Just name it, we did it. Bases loaded, nothing. Home run. No pitching, no catching, no managing."

Marlins move back to five-man rotation

NEW YORK -- For the homestretch, the Marlins are going back to a five-man rotation.

After being with a six-man staff for a few weeks, left-hander Wade LeBlanc is back in the bullpen. Everyone else is being pushed up a day.

LeBlanc threw an inning of relief on Friday night in Miami's 7-3 loss to the Mets at Citi Field.

LeBlanc was lined up to start on Tuesday at Atlanta. But now, Josh Johnson will move into that slot.

"For me, it was for the rest period," pitching coach Randy St. Claire said. "Pitching once every eight days or every seven days, it was hard to stay sharp."

The rotation shapes up now with Mark Buehrle pitching Saturday at New York, and Ricky Nolasco starting the series finale on Sunday.

Miami is off on Monday, before opening a three-game set at Atlanta. For the Braves' series, the Marlins will go with Nathan Eovaldi (Tuesday), Johnson (Wednesday) and Jacob Turner (Thursday).

"With the two off-days we are getting right now, a couple of them were going eight days, and seven every time out," St. Claire said.

Outfielder Cousins recalled to add depth

NEW YORK -- When Justin Ruggiano walked off the field with a sprained right shoulder on Friday night, the Marlins front office began scrambling.

A phone call was quickly made to Scott Cousins, who was sitting on his couch at his home in the San Francisco area.

About 6:30 p.m. PT, Cousins heard he was being recalled. The left-handed hitting outfielder, who finished up with Triple-A New Orleans three weeks earlier, made a 11 p.m. flight to New York.

"I got on a plane at 11," Cousins said. "No sleep. I tried. I think I might have gotten 15 or 20 minutes on the plane. I came straight here."

The Marlins outfield is thin with Ruggiano, Giancarlo Stanton (left intercostal injury) and Austin Kearns (back) all unavailable on Saturday.

"I was three weeks into my offseason," Cousins said. "I took about two weeks doing nothing. Just this week I started on baseball stuff again. I don't know how it worked out so well. I had just literally gotten home after working out on the field, hitting and running. That's when I got a call."

Worth noting

• A mental lapse cost the Marlins a run in the fifth inning, and Jose Reyes accepts the blame. Ike Davis lined out to Reyes at shortstop. Unaware there was just one out, Reyes thought he caught the third out. So he didn't react immediately. If he had, he would have doubled up Daniel Murphy, who was well off the base, at second. Scott Hairston followed with an RBI triple. On the play, Justin Ruggiano sprained his right shoulder while making a diving attempt.

"I thought it was three outs right there," Reyes said. "It cost us a run. That was an easy double play right there. It was my mistake. I have to be more focused in that situation, and know how many outs we have. That happens once in a while."