BOSTON -- Carl Crawford had four at-bats in an extended spring game in Fort Myers, Fla., on Tuesday, his first game action for the Red Sox since last season ended.

"He walked in one of [the at-bats], attempted a stolen base," manager Bobby Valentine said Tuesday. "Hit the ball the other three times and felt great after the game."

Crawford, who was most recently slowed by soreness in his left elbow, initially was held up this spring by surgery and inflammation in his left wrist. Crawford said on Sunday while still in Boston that he was not planning to test the elbow with throwing until next week.

Left-handers Rich Hill and Andrew Miller both made rehab appearances on Monday. Hill, in his fourth appearance on the way back from Tommy John surgery, struck out two in one inning for Class A Salem. He's given up one run in five innings in his rehab appearances and is next scheduled to pitch Wednesday, again with Salem. Hill has also pitched for Class A Greenville.

Miller, out with a left hamstring strain, struck out the side in his one inning of work with Triple-A Pawtucket. In five rehab outings split between Class A and Triple-A, he's allowed four runs in five innings and struck out nine.

Right-hander Daisuke Matsuzaka threw on Tuesday, according to the Naples Daily News. Matsuzaka, like Hill, is recovering from Tommy John surgery.

Ellsbury will not need shoulder surgery

BOSTON -- Rest and treatment should be all Red Sox center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury needs, not surgery.

Dr. Lewis Yocum, the Angels' team doctor, reviewed an MRI of Ellsbury's subluxed (partially dislocated) right shoulder and agreed with the team's initial diagnosis that he can return without going under the knife.

"Take it slowly to get it better," manager Bobby Valentine said Tuesday of the plan. "I don't know that there's anything on the horizon, other than just normal treatment and see how he feels day to day."

Valentine said there was a "consensus of opinion on what the damage was and how to proceed." Valentine did not offer a timetable. The belief is Ellsbury will be out at least six weeks.

Ellsbury on Tuesday did small exercises as he begins the recovery process. Ellsbury has not spoken with reporters since he was hurt Friday trying to break up a double play against the Rays.

"Ellsbury continued his treatment," Valentine said. "He manipulated his shoulder a little -- just hand manipulation of his shoulder a little, just for range of motion."

Youkilis moves past flare-up with Valentine

BOSTON -- There's all sorts of fast healing going on for Kevin Youkilis.

The Red Sox's third baseman was back in the lineup Tuesday against the Rangers, a day after he sat because of a bothersome right groin and dealt with his manager, Bobby Valentine, who appeared critical of the veteran in a TV interview Sunday.

"I really don't want to talk much about [the Valentine situation] anymore," Youkilis said. "I said what I said yesterday and that's all I got for you."

That took care of one issue. As for the other, Youkilis said his groin, which he hurt scoring the go-ahead run Sunday against Tampa Bay on a 270-foot dash from first to home, was no longer a problem.

"I slid kind of funky and I just kind of grabbed a little bit on the slide," Youkilis said. "Just the way I slid around the thing, it kind of just caught a little funky. ... It was one of those things where if it was a seven o'clock game, it would've been fine, but the medical stuff didn't want to any [risks] earlier and do some work with me longer. So we took care of it and it's all good."

Though Youkilis was reluctant to talk about the verbal dust-up that ensued when Valentine appeared to question his dedication, Youkilis did say he hoped the team would be able to move forward. Valentine apologized Monday, and general manager Ben Cherington addressed the situation as well.

Teammates like Dustin Pedroia came to Youkilis' defense quickly, and he appreciated that.

"It's always good when you're teammates have your back, and that's what we've done for each other," Youkilis said. "It's good. There's a lot of good guys in here and there's things we do off the field, too, and we stick together, and this environment can be rough. In this town, sometimes, if you're not playing [well] the first four games and stuff like that, it can be a little rough, so you have to stick together. We've done a good job with that."