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FanFest
2012 Major League Baseball All-Star FanFest Legends Schedule
Dates and Times of Sessions are Subject to Change
(Players Confirmed As of July 1, 2012)


GEORGE BRETT - DIAMOND CLINIC - 9:30 AM - 10:00 AM

GEORGE BRETT George Brett was a 1999 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and is the only Royal who is a member of the halls of Cooperstown. Primarily a third baseman, he spent his entire 21-year Major League career (1973-1993) with the Kansas City Royals, hitting .305 with 317 home runs, 1,595 RBI and 665 doubles and leading the Royals' 1985 World Series Championship squad. He was the American League Most Valuable Player in 1980, when he won the batting title with a .390 average and hit 24 home runs with a career-high 118 RBI. His .390 batting average was the highest in the game since Ted Williams' landmark .406 average in 1941. Brett finished in the top three in MVP voting three additional times. He was a 13-time A.L. All-Star, representing the Royals in the Midsummer Classic each year from 1976-1988. Brett was a three-time A.L. batting champion (1976, 1980, 1990), becoming the first player to win the batting title in three different decades. He is one of 28 members of baseball's 3,000 hit club, and entering the 2012 season, his 3,154 hits ranked 14th all-time.



FRIDAY, JULY 6TH - 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

JIM EISENREICH - Q&A SESSION - 12:30 PM - 1:00 PM

JIM EISENREICH Jim Eisenreich was an outfielder in the Major Leagues for 15 seasons with the Minnesota Twins (1982-84), Kansas City Royals (1987-92), Philadelphia Phillies (1993-96), Florida Marlins (1997-98) and Los Angeles Dodgers (1998). In each of his four seasons with the Phillies, the 16th round selection in the 1980 First-Year Player Draft batted over .300, including a career-best .361 in 1996. Eisenreich was a member of the 1993 National League Champion Philadelphia Phillies, and a part of the 1997 World Champion Florida Marlins. During the 1997 Fall Classic, Jim hit .500 with a home run and three RBI as the Marlins topped the Cleveland Indians in seven games. In 1,422 career games, Eisenreich hit .290 and collected 1,160 hits, including 221 doubles, 39 triples, 52 homers and 477 RBI.



DENNIS LEONARD - DIAMOND CLINIC - 12:30 PM - 1:00 PM

DENNIS LEONARD Dennis Leonard spent his entire 12-year Major League career as a pitcher with the Kansas City Royals, from 1974-1986. He went 144-106 (.576) in his career with a 3.70 ERA. The right-hander was a three-time 20-game winner (1977-78, 1980), all of which came during a streak of eight consecutive years of 10 or more wins. The durable hurler finished fourth in American League Cy Young Award balloting in 1977, when he went 20-12 with a 3.04 ERA and 21 complete games in his 37 starts. Leonard led the A.L. in starts three times in a span of four years (1978, 1980-81), and more than one-third of his 302 career starts went for complete games (103). The New York native pitched in five Postseasons for the Royals.



FRIDAY, JULY 6TH 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

WILLIE WILSON

WILLIE WILSON Willie Wilson played 19 years as an outfielder in the Major Leagues with the Kansas City Royals (1976-90), Oakland Athletics (1991-92) and Chicago Cubs (1993-94). Wilson, who was selected 18th overall by the Royals in the 1974 First-Year Player Draft, led the American League with 83 stolen bases in 1979 during his first season as an everyday player. In 1980, Wilson led the A.L. in plate appearances (745), at-bats (705), runs (133), hits (230) and triples (15), while finishing fourth in the MVP voting and earning his only career Gold Glove Award. His 705 at-bats during the 1980 season established a single-season record (later broken by Jimmy Rollins in 2007) as he became the first player in history to reach 700 at-bats in a single season en route to helping the Royals claim the A.L. Pennant. In 1982, Wilson posted a career-best and A.L.-leading .332 batting average, and was selected to his first of two All-Star Games (1982-83). Willie hit .367 during the 1985 World Series as the Royals claimed the franchise's only World Championship with a seven-game series victory over the St. Louis Cardinals. Wilson, who led the A.L. in triples five times, retired with 2,207 career hits and 668 stolen bases, and was elected to the Royals Hall of Fame in 2000.



FRIDAY, JULY 6TH 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

WILLIE AIKENS - DIAMOND CLINIC - 1:00 PM - 1:30 PM

WILLIE AIKENS Willie Aikens played eight seasons in the Major Leagues as a first baseman for the California Angels (1977, 79), Kansas City Royals (1980-83) and Toronto Blue Jays (1984-85). Aikens recorded five consecutive seasons with at least 15 home runs from 1979-83, including a career-best 23 homers in 1983. The Seneca, South Carolina native helped the Royals to a World Series berth in 1980, batting .364 (4-for-11) with two RBI in the ALCS before hitting .400 (8-for-20) with four homers and eight RBI in the six-game loss to the Phillies in the Fall Classic. In Game 3, Aikens delivered the game-winning RBI in the bottom of the 10th inning to deliver the first World Series win in Royals history. In 12 career Postseason games, Willie batted .375 (15-for-40) with four home runs and 10 RBI. Aikens, who hit a home run in his final Major League at-bat, finished his career with a .271 batting average, 110 home runs and 415 RBI in 774 games played.



JOHN WATHAN - Q&A Session - 1:00 PM - 1:30 PM

John Wathan John spent his entire 10-year Major League career as a catcher with the Kansas City Royals. He batted .262 in his career with 21 home runs, 261 RBI and 105 stolen bases. He was a part of seven Royals' playoff teams, including their two American League Championship teams and the 1985 World Series Championship club. His finest season was in 1980, when he batted .305 with six home runs, 58 RBI and a .377 on-base percentage. He stole 36 bases in 1982. Wathan managed the Royals from 1987-1991, leading the club to winning seasons in 1988 and 1989, and he guided the California Angels for part of the 1992 season. John's son Dusty, a catcher, played for the Royals in 2002.



JEFF MONTGOMERY - DIAMOND CLINIC - 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM

JEFF MONTGOMERY Jeff Montgomery pitched in the Major Leagues for 13 seasons with the Cincinnati Reds (1987) and Kansas City Royals (1988-99). The right-hander was selected by the Reds in the ninth round of the 1983 First-Year Player Draft, and he was acquired by the Royals following his rookie season. The three-time American League All-Star (1992-93, 96) converted a career-best 45 saves during the 1993 season, which was tied for the A.L. lead and is also tied with Dan Quisenberry (1983) for Kansas City's single-season record. Montgomery, who finished his career with a mark of 46-52 with a 3.27 ERA, recorded 304 career saves and is one of just 23 pitchers in history to eclipse the 300-save mark.



FRIDAY, JULY 6TH 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

JEFF MONTGOMERY

JEFF MONTGOMERY Jeff Montgomery pitched in the Major Leagues for 13 seasons with the Cincinnati Reds (1987) and Kansas City Royals (1988-99). The right-hander was selected by the Reds in the ninth round of the 1983 First-Year Player Draft, and he was acquired by the Royals following his rookie season. The three-time American League All-Star (1992-93, 96) converted a career-best 45 saves during the 1993 season, which was tied for the A.L. lead and is also tied with Dan Quisenberry (1983) for Kansas City's single-season record. Montgomery, who finished his career with a mark of 46-52 with a 3.27 ERA, recorded 304 career saves and is one of just 23 pitchers in history to eclipse the 300-save mark.



ROLLIE FINGERS - Q&A SESSION - 5:00 PM - 5:30 PM

ROLLIE FINGERS Fingers pitched in the Major Leagues from 1968-1985 and was a key pitcher for Oakland's three straight World Series Championship teams from 1972-74. A 1992 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, he was a seven-time All-Star and the 1981 winner of both the American League Most Valuable Player and the AL Cy Young Award after going 6-3 with a 1.04 ERA and 28 saves for the Brewers. Fingers was the Most Valuable Player of the 1974 World Series.



FRIDAY, JULY 6TH 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

ROLLIE FINGERS

ROLLIE FINGERS Fingers pitched in the Major Leagues from 1968-1985 and was a key pitcher for Oakland's three straight World Series Championship teams from 1972-74. A 1992 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, he was a seven-time All-Star and the 1981 winner of both the American League Most Valuable Player and the AL Cy Young Award after going 6-3 with a 1.04 ERA and 28 saves for the Brewers. Fingers was the Most Valuable Player of the 1974 World Series.



JOE AZCUE

Joe Azcue played 11 seasons in the Major Leagues with the Cincinnati Reds (1960), Kansas City Athletics (1962-63), Cleveland Indians (1963-69), Boston Red Sox (1969), California Angels (1969-70, 72) and Milwaukee Brewers (1972). The Cuban-born catcher posted career-highs in 1963 with a .281 batting average, 14 home runs, 46 RBI, 16 doubles and a .460 slugging percentage in just 96 games played. Azcue was selected to his lone All-Star Game in 1968, when he recorded a career-best 100 hits in 357 at-bats over 115 games played. "The Immortal Azcue" led all A.L. catchers in fielding percentage in 1967 (.999) and 1968 (.996). Joe, who ended his career with 50 home runs and 304 RBI in 909 career games, caught two no-hitters during his career: Sonny Siebert in 1966 and Clyde Wright in 1970.



DIEGO SEGUI

DIEGO SEGUI Diego Segui was a 15-year Major League pitcher, with the Kansas City Athletics (1962-1965, 1967), the Washington Senators (1966), the Oakland Athletics (1968, 1970-1972), the Seattle Pilots (1969), the St. Louis Cardinals (1972-1973), the Boston Red Sox (1974-1975) and the Seattle Mariners (1977). The forkball specialist posted a career record of 92-111 and a 3.81 ERA in 639 games, including 171 starts. He posted a Major League-best 2.56 ERA for the A's in 1970. Segui pitched for both of the Seattle's Major League franchises, the Pilots and the Mariners, in their inaugural games. Segui, a native of Cuba, is the father of longtime Major League first baseman David Segui.



SATURDAY, JULY 7TH 10:00 AM - 12:00 AM

ROLLIE FINGERS

ROLLIE FINGERS Fingers pitched in the Major Leagues from 1968-1985 and was a key pitcher for Oakland's three straight World Series Championship teams from 1972-74. A 1992 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, he was a seven-time All-Star and the 1981 winner of both the American League Most Valuable Player and the AL Cy Young Award after going 6-3 with a 1.04 ERA and 28 saves for the Brewers. Fingers was the Most Valuable Player of the 1974 World Series.





MIKE SWEENEY

MIKE SWEENEY Mike Sweeney was an infielder in the Major Leagues for 16 seasons with the Kansas City Royals (1995-2007), Oakland Athletics (2008), Seattle Mariners (2009-10) and Philadelphia Phillies (2010). Selected by the Royals in the 10th round of the 1991 First-Year Player Draft, Sweeney went on to earn five A.L. All-Star selections (2000-03, 2005). Sweeney posted six seasons of at least 20 home runs, including four consecutive from 1999-2002, and he recorded a 25-game hitting streak during the 1999 season, tied for third-best in franchise history. In 2000, Mike posted career-bests with 159 games played, 618 at-bats, 105 runs scored, 206 hits, 29 home runs (also 2001) and a club-record 144 RBI while batting .333 (second only to his .340 mark in 2002). Sweeney made his only Postseason appearance in his final season with the Phillies in 2010 and recorded a single in his lone career Postseason at-bat. In 1,454 career games, Mike batted .297 with 1,540 hits, 325 doubles, 215 home runs and 909 RBI.



JOHN MAYBERRY - DIAMOND CLINIC - 11:00 AM - 11:30 AM

JOHN MAYBERRY John Mayberry was a 15-year Major League first baseman, playing for the Houston Astros (1968-71), the Kansas City Royals (1972-77), the Toronto Blue Jays (1978-82) and the New York Yankees (1982). He was an American League All-Star in 1973 and 1974. A selective left-handed hitter and a consistent run producer, Mayberry collected 100 RBI three times in a span of four seasons (1972-73, 1975), and he led the A.L. in walks in 1973 and 1975. His .417 on-base percentage was the A.L.'s best in '73. Mayberry set career-highs with 95 runs, 38 doubles, 34 home runs and 106 RBI in 1975, when he was the runner-up for A.L. Most Valuable Player honors. He helped the Royals reach two Postseasons (1976-77). John's son, John Jr., is currently an outfielder with the Philadelphia Phillies.



SATURDAY, JULY 7TH 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

DAVE WINFIELD - Q&A SESSION - 12:00 PM - 12:30 PM

DAVE WINFIELD Dave Winfield's career is a unique chapter of American sports history. Hailed as one of the greatest athletes ever to play professional sports, he is one of only 7 players in the history of Major League Baseball to reach over 3,000 hits and over 450 home runs. The 12-time All-Star is amongst the all-time leaders in hits, home runs and RBI. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2001 -- his first year of eligibility.


JOHN MAYBERRY

JOHN MAYBERRY John Mayberry was a 15-year Major League first baseman, playing for the Houston Astros (1968-71), the Kansas City Royals (1972-77), the Toronto Blue Jays (1978-82) and the New York Yankees (1982). He was an American League All-Star in 1973 and 1974. A selective left-handed hitter and a consistent run producer, Mayberry collected 100 RBI three times in a span of four seasons (1972-73, 1975), and he led the A.L. in walks in 1973 and 1975. His .417 on-base percentage was the A.L.'s best in '73. Mayberry set career-highs with 95 runs, 38 doubles, 34 home runs and 106 RBI in 1975, when he was the runner-up for A.L. Most Valuable Player honors. He helped the Royals reach two Postseasons (1976-77). John's son, John Jr., is currently an outfielder with the Philadelphia Phillies.



MIKE SWEENEY - DIAMOND CLINIC - 12:30 PM - 1:00 PM

MIKE SWEENEY Mike Sweeney was an infielder in the Major Leagues for 16 seasons with the Kansas City Royals (1995-2007), Oakland Athletics (2008), Seattle Mariners (2009-10) and Philadelphia Phillies (2010). Selected by the Royals in the 10th round of the 1991 First-Year Player Draft, Sweeney went on to earn five A.L. All-Star selections (2000-03, 2005). Sweeney posted six seasons of at least 20 home runs, including four consecutive from 1999-2002, and he recorded a 25-game hitting streak during the 1999 season, tied for third-best in franchise history. In 2000, Mike posted career-bests with 159 games played, 618 at-bats, 105 runs scored, 206 hits, 29 home runs (also 2001) and a club-record 144 RBI while batting .333 (second only to his .340 mark in 2002). Sweeney made his only Postseason appearance in his final season with the Phillies in 2010 and recorded a single in his lone career Postseason at-bat. In 1,454 career games, Mike batted .297 with 1,540 hits, 325 doubles, 215 home runs and 909 RBI.



FRANK WHITE - Q&A SESSION - 1:00 PM - 1:30 PM

FRANK WHITE Frank White spent his entire 18-year Major League career (1973-1990) with the Kansas City Royals. The second baseman was a part of the 1985 World Championship team and helped lead the Royals to their first World Series appearance in 1980, when he was ALCS MVP after batting .545 with a home run and three RBI in a three-game sweep over the New York Yankees. The Kansas City native was a five-time A.L. All-Star (1978-79, 81-82, 86) and an eight-time Gold Glover, including six consecutive from 1977-82 (also 86-87). White, who was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame and had his number 20 retired by the club in 1995, ended his career with 2,006 hits, 407 doubles and 912 runs scored over 2,324 career games, including a franchise-record 2,154 games at second base. White and his longtime teammate George Brett are the only Royals' players ever to have their numbers retired.



DAVE WINFIELD - DIAMOND CLINIC - 1:00 PM - 1:30 PM

DAVE WINFIELD Dave Winfield's career is a unique chapter of American sports history. Hailed as one of the greatest athletes ever to play professional sports, he is one of only 7 players in the history of Major League Baseball to reach over 3,000 hits and over 450 home runs. The 12-time All-Star is amongst the all-time leaders in hits, home runs and RBI. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2001 -- his first year of eligibility.



SATURDAY, JULY 7TH 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

BO JACKSON - AUTOGRAPH SESSION - 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

BO JACKSON Bo Jackson started his professional career in 1986, he played for the Kansas City Royals, the Chicago White Sox and the California Angels. During his time in baseball, he was the 1989 All-Star Game MVP, achieved four 20-home-run seasons, and tied the record for most consecutive at-bat home runs with four home runs. In his eight baseball seasons, Jackson had a career batting average of .250, hit 141 home runs and had 415 RBIs, with a slugging average of .474. His best year was 1989, with his effort earning him all-star status. In '89, Bo ranked fourth in the league in both home runs, with 32 and RBI, with 105



JEFF MONTGOMERY

JEFF MONTGOMERY Jeff Montgomery pitched in the Major Leagues for 13 seasons with the Cincinnati Reds (1987) and Kansas City Royals (1988-99). The right-hander was selected by the Reds in the ninth round of the 1983 First-Year Player Draft, and he was acquired by the Royals following his rookie season. The three-time American League All-Star (1992-93, 96) converted a career-best 45 saves during the 1993 season, which was tied for the A.L. lead and is also tied with Dan Quisenberry (1983) for Kansas City's single-season record. Montgomery, who finished his career with a mark of 46-52 with a 3.27 ERA, recorded 304 career saves and is one of just 23 pitchers in history to eclipse the 300-save mark.



ANDRE DAWSON - Q&A SESSION - 2:00 PM

ANDRE DAWSON Andre Dawson was a 2010 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Dawson played 21 seasons in the Major Leagues with the Montreal Expos (1976-86), the Chicago Cubs (1987-1992), the Boston Red Sox (1993-1994) and the Florida Marlins (1995-96). He was the recipient of the 1977 National League Rookie of the Year Award. He posted 78 extra-base hits (36 2B, 10 3B, 32 HR) in 1983 for the Expos. Dawson was named N.L. MVP in 1987 after hitting 49 home runs with 137 RBI for the Cubs. "The Hawk" was an eight-time N.L. All-Star (1981-1983 and 1987-1991) and an eight-time Gold Glove winner. He had 13 seasons of 20 or more home runs. Andre was a member of both the 1981 N.L. East Champion Montreal Expos and the 1989 N.L. East Champion Chicago Cubs. Dawson is now in his 13th season as a special assistant to the President of the Miami Marlins.



ANDRE DAWSON - DIAMOND CLINIC - 3:00 PM

ANDRE DAWSON Andre Dawson was a 2010 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Dawson played 21 seasons in the Major Leagues with the Montreal Expos (1976-86), the Chicago Cubs (1987-1992), the Boston Red Sox (1993-1994) and the Florida Marlins (1995-96). He was the recipient of the 1977 National League Rookie of the Year Award. He posted 78 extra-base hits (36 2B, 10 3B, 32 HR) in 1983 for the Expos. Dawson was named N.L. MVP in 1987 after hitting 49 home runs with 137 RBI for the Cubs. "The Hawk" was an eight-time N.L. All-Star (1981-1983 and 1987-1991) and an eight-time Gold Glove winner. He had 13 seasons of 20 or more home runs. Andre was a member of both the 1981 N.L. East Champion Montreal Expos and the 1989 N.L. East Champion Chicago Cubs. Dawson is now in his 13th season as a special assistant to the President of the Miami Marlins.



FERGUSON JENKINS - Q&A SESSION - 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM

FERGUSON JENKINS Ferguson Jenkins played in the Major Leagues from 1965-1983. He was a 1991 inductee into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. He went 284-226 (557) with a 3.34 ERA in his career. He won the 1971 National League Cy Young Award, leading the NL in innings, wins and complete games. An NL All-Star in 1967, 1971 and 1972, he was a 20-game winner seven times. His 2,038 career strikeouts are the most in Cubs history.





FRANK WHITE

FRANK WHITE Frank White spent his entire 18-year Major League career (1973-1990) with the Kansas City Royals. The second baseman was a part of the 1985 World Championship team and helped lead the Royals to their first World Series appearance in 1980, when he was ALCS MVP after batting .545 with a home run and three RBI in a three-game sweep over the New York Yankees. The Kansas City native was a five-time A.L. All-Star (1978-79, 81-82, 86) and an eight-time Gold Glover, including six consecutive from 1977-82 (also 86-87). White, who was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame and had his number 20 retired by the club in 1995, ended his career with 2,006 hits, 407 doubles and 912 runs scored over 2,324 career games, including a franchise-record 2,154 games at second base. White and his longtime teammate George Brett are the only Royals' players ever to have their numbers retired.



SATURDAY, JULY 7TH 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

FERGUSON JENKINS

FERGUSON JENKINS Ferguson Jenkins played in the Major Leagues from 1965-1983. He was a 1991 inductee into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. He went 284-226 (557) with a 3.34 ERA in his career. He won the 1971 National League Cy Young Award, leading the NL in innings, wins and complete games. An NL All-Star in 1967, 1971 and 1972, he was a 20-game winner seven times. His 2,038 career strikeouts are the most in Cubs history.





AMOS OTIS - Q&A SESSION - 5:00 PM - 5:30 PM

AMOS OTIS Amos Otis was a 17-year outfielder with the New York Mets (1967, 1969), the Kansas City Royals (1970-83) and the Pittsburgh Pirates (1987). Otis was a five-time American League All-Star (1970-73, 1976) with the Royals. He finished among the top 10 in A.L. Most Valuable Player balloting four times in his career. Otis was a career .277 hitter with 193 home runs, 1,007 RBI and 341 stolen bases. His 52 steals in 1971 led the A.L., and he twice led the league in doubles. Otis set career-highs with 26 home runs in 1973 and with 96 RBI in 1978. The outfielder was a three-time Gold Glover.



TOM "FLASH" GORDON - Diamond Clinic - 5:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Tom Right-handed pitcher Tom Gordon played 21 seasons in the Majors, for the Kansas City Royals (1988-95), Boston Red Sox (1996-99), Chicago Cubs (2001-02), Houston Astros (2002), Chicago White Sox (2003), New York Yankees (2004-05), Philadelphia Phillies (2006-08) and Arizona Diamondbacks (2009). In his first 10 Major League seasons, "Flash" started 203 of the 350 games that he appeared in, highlighted by a 17-9 mark for the Royals in 1989, when he finished second in A.L. Rookie of the Year voting. The three-time All-Star (1998, 2004, 2006) converted 158 career saves, including a career-best and American League-leading 46 saves in 1998 in his first full season as a reliever. The 46 successful conversions still stands as a Red Sox franchise record for a single season. Gordon, the father of current Los Angeles Dodgers shortstop Dee Gordon, finished his career with a record of 138-126 with a 3.96 ERA in 890 games.



SATURDAY, JULY 7TH 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

AMOS OTIS

AMOS OTIS Amos Otis was a 17-year outfielder with the New York Mets (1967, 1969), the Kansas City Royals (1970-83) and the Pittsburgh Pirates (1987). Otis was a five-time American League All-Star (1970-73, 1976) with the Royals. He finished among the top 10 in A.L. Most Valuable Player balloting four times in his career. Otis was a career .277 hitter with 193 home runs, 1,007 RBI and 341 stolen bases. His 52 steals in 1971 led the A.L., and he twice led the league in doubles. Otis set career-highs with 26 home runs in 1973 and with 96 RBI in 1978. The outfielder was a three-time Gold Glover.



TOM "FLASH" GORDON

Tom Right-handed pitcher Tom Gordon played 21 seasons in the Majors, for the Kansas City Royals (1988-95), Boston Red Sox (1996-99), Chicago Cubs (2001-02), Houston Astros (2002), Chicago White Sox (2003), New York Yankees (2004-05), Philadelphia Phillies (2006-08) and Arizona Diamondbacks (2009). In his first 10 Major League seasons, "Flash" started 203 of the 350 games that he appeared in, highlighted by a 17-9 mark for the Royals in 1989, when he finished second in A.L. Rookie of the Year voting. The three-time All-Star (1998, 2004, 2006) converted 158 career saves, including a career-best and American League-leading 46 saves in 1998 in his first full season as a reliever. The 46 successful conversions still stands as a Red Sox franchise record for a single season. Gordon, the father of current Los Angeles Dodgers shortstop Dee Gordon, finished his career with a record of 138-126 with a 3.96 ERA in 890 games.



SUNDAY, JULY 8TH 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

JOE CARTER - Diamond Clinic - 9:30 AM - 10:00AM

Joe Carter Joe Carter played in the Major Leagues as an outfielder for 16 years, with the Chicago Cubs (1983), the Cleveland Indians (1984-1989), the San Diego Padres (1990), the Toronto Blue Jays (1991-1997), the Baltimore Orioles (1998) and the San Francisco Giants (1998). The Oklahoma native was a five-time American League All-Star. The durable, consistent run producer batted .259 with 396 home runs, 1,445 RBI and 231 stolen bases in his career. Carter collected eight seasons of more than 100 RBI, including a Major League-best 121 in 1986. He helped lead the Blue Jays to back-to-back World Series Championships in 1992 and 1993, the first titles in club history. His three-run blast in the bottom of the ninth of Game Six of the 1993 World Series, which ended the Fall Classic and clinched Toronto's second straight crown, is regarded as one of the most famous home runs in baseball history. Carter joined Hall of Famer Bill Mazeroski as the only two players to win a World Series with a home run in the bottom of the ninth inning of the decisive game. In 12 World Series games with the Blue Jays, Carter batted .277 with four home runs, 11 RBI and eight runs scored.



GAYLORD PERRY

GAYLORD PERRY Gaylord Perry, who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991, pitched for 22 seasons in the Major Leagues from 1962-1983. Perry, a five-time All Star, is one of five pitchers in Major League history to win the Cy Young Award in each League, capturing the award in the American League in 1972 and in the National League in 1978. In addition, he recorded five seasons of at least 20 wins en route to 314 career victories. In 1972 with the Cleveland Indians, he led the A.L. in wins, posting a 24-16 record, with an ERA of 1.92. In 1978, Perry went 21-6 with a 2.73 ERA for the San Diego Padres, leading the N.L. in wins. Gaylord and his brother, Jim (1970), are the only pair of brothers in Major League history to each win the Cy Young Award.



ANDRE DAWSON - Q&A SESSION - 10:00 AM

ANDRE DAWSON Andre Dawson was a 2010 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Dawson played 21 seasons in the Major Leagues with the Montreal Expos (1976-86), the Chicago Cubs (1987-1992), the Boston Red Sox (1993-1994) and the Florida Marlins (1995-96). He was the recipient of the 1977 National League Rookie of the Year Award. He posted 78 extra-base hits (36 2B, 10 3B, 32 HR) in 1983 for the Expos. Dawson was named N.L. MVP in 1987 after hitting 49 home runs with 137 RBI for the Cubs. "The Hawk" was an eight-time N.L. All-Star (1981-1983 and 1987-1991) and an eight-time Gold Glove winner. He had 13 seasons of 20 or more home runs. Andre was a member of both the 1981 N.L. East Champion Montreal Expos and the 1989 N.L. East Champion Chicago Cubs. Dawson is now in his 13th season as a special assistant to the President of the Miami Marlins.



JUAN MARICHAL - AUTOGRAPH SESSION - 10:00 AM -12:00 PM

JUAN MARICHAL Juan Marichal pitched in the Major Leagues from 1960-1975. A 1983 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, he won 243 games and lost only 142 in his career with a 2.89 ERA, fanning 2,303 batters. "The Dominican Dandy" was a six-time 20-game winner for the Giants. He spun a no-hitter against Houston in 1963. A nine-time All-Star, he pitched in eight All-Star Games, hurling 14-consecutive scoreless frames over his final seven All-Star Game outings. Marichal was the Most Valuable Player in the 1965 All-Star Game after facing the minimum nine batters over his three-inning start.



BRET SABERHAGEN - DIAMOND CLINIC - 11:00 AM - 11:30 AM

BRET SABERHAGEN Bret Saberhagen was a 16-year pitcher with the Kansas City Royals (1984-91), the New York Mets (1992-95), the Colorado Rockies (1995-96) and the Boston Red Sox (1997-2001). He was a two-time winner of the American League Cy Young Award (1985, 1989), becoming the first Royal ever to win pitching's highest honor, and he remains the club's only two-time winner. With his pinpoint location, "Sabes" posted a 167-117 (.588) record and a 3.34 ERA in his career, including a 110-78 mark for the Royals. He was a three-time All-Star overall, including twice with the Royals (1987, 1990; also: 1994, with the Mets). In '85, he was the ace of the Royals' World Championship club, going 20-6 with a 2.87 ERA in his second Major League season. He remains the youngest World Series Most Valuable Player ever, winning at the age of 21 years and six months after going 2-0 with 0.50 ERA in his two complete games, which included the Game Seven clincher. In 1989, he set a club-record for wins by going 23-6 with a Major League-best 2.16 ERA and 12 complete games.



LOU BROCK - Q&A SESSION - 11:30 AM - 12:00 PM

LOU BROCK A 1985 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and a six-time National League All-Star, Brock led the NL in stolen bases eight times and in runs twice and was a member of two World Series Championship teams with the Cardinals (1964 and 1967). He held baseball's record for most career stolen bases (938) until being passed by Rickey Henderson. Brock hit a combined .391 (34-87) in the Fall Classic with four home runs and 13 RBI in 21 games, and he stole seven bases in both the '67 and '68 World Series.



SUNDAY, JULY 8TH 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

BRET SABERHAGEN

BRET SABERHAGEN Bret Saberhagen was a 16-year pitcher with the Kansas City Royals (1984-91), the New York Mets (1992-95), the Colorado Rockies (1995-96) and the Boston Red Sox (1997-2001). He was a two-time winner of the American League Cy Young Award (1985, 1989), becoming the first Royal ever to win pitching's highest honor, and he remains the club's only two-time winner. With his pinpoint location, "Sabes" posted a 167-117 (.588) record and a 3.34 ERA in his career, including a 110-78 mark for the Royals. He was a three-time All-Star overall, including twice with the Royals (1987, 1990; also: 1994, with the Mets). In '85, he was the ace of the Royals' World Championship club, going 20-6 with a 2.87 ERA in his second Major League season. He remains the youngest World Series Most Valuable Player ever, winning at the age of 21 years and six months after going 2-0 with 0.50 ERA in his two complete games, which included the Game Seven clincher. In 1989, he set a club-record for wins by going 23-6 with a Major League-best 2.16 ERA and 12 complete games.



LOU BROCK - Q&A SESSION - 12:00 PM - 12:30 PM

LOU BROCK A 1985 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and a six-time National League All-Star, Brock led the NL in stolen bases eight times and in runs twice and was a member of two World Series Championship teams with the Cardinals (1964 and 1967). He held baseball's record for most career stolen bases (938) until being passed by Rickey Henderson. Brock hit a combined .391 (34-87) in the Fall Classic with four home runs and 13 RBI in 21 games, and he stole seven bases in both the '67 and '68 World Series.



GAYLORD PERRY - Q&A SESSION - 12:30 PM - 1:00 PM

GAYLORD PERRY Gaylord Perry, who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991, pitched for 22 seasons in the Major Leagues from 1962-1983. Perry, a five-time All Star, is one of five pitchers in Major League history to win the Cy Young Award in each League, capturing the award in the American League in 1972 and in the National League in 1978. In addition, he recorded five seasons of at least 20 wins en route to 314 career victories. In 1972 with the Cleveland Indians, he led the A.L. in wins, posting a 24-16 record, with an ERA of 1.92. In 1978, Perry went 21-6 with a 2.73 ERA for the San Diego Padres, leading the N.L. in wins. Gaylord and his brother, Jim (1970), are the only pair of brothers in Major League history to each win the Cy Young Award.



JUAN MARICHAL - Q&A SESSION - 12:30 PM -1:00 PM

JUAN MARICHAL Juan Marichal pitched in the Major Leagues from 1960-1975. A 1983 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, he won 243 games and lost only 142 in his career with a 2.89 ERA, fanning 2,303 batters. "The Dominican Dandy" was a six-time 20-game winner for the Giants. He spun a no-hitter against Houston in 1963. A nine-time All-Star, he pitched in eight All-Star Games, hurling 14-consecutive scoreless frames over his final seven All-Star Game outings. Marichal was the Most Valuable Player in the 1965 All-Star Game after facing the minimum nine batters over his three-inning start.



FERGUSON JENKINS - DIAMOND CLINIC - 1:00 PM - 1:30 PM

FERGUSON JENKINS Ferguson Jenkins played in the Major Leagues from 1965-1983. He was a 1991 inductee into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. He went 284-226 (557) with a 3.34 ERA in his career. He won the 1971 National League Cy Young Award, leading the NL in innings, wins and complete games. An NL All-Star in 1967, 1971 and 1972, he was a 20-game winner seven times. His 2,038 career strikeouts are the most in Cubs history.





SUNDAY, JULY 8TH 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

ANDRE DAWSON - AUTOGRAPH SESSION - 2:00 PM

ANDRE DAWSON Andre Dawson was a 2010 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Dawson played 21 seasons in the Major Leagues with the Montreal Expos (1976-86), the Chicago Cubs (1987-1992), the Boston Red Sox (1993-1994) and the Florida Marlins (1995-96). He was the recipient of the 1977 National League Rookie of the Year Award. He posted 78 extra-base hits (36 2B, 10 3B, 32 HR) in 1983 for the Expos. Dawson was named N.L. MVP in 1987 after hitting 49 home runs with 137 RBI for the Cubs. "The Hawk" was an eight-time N.L. All-Star (1981-1983 and 1987-1991) and an eight-time Gold Glove winner. He had 13 seasons of 20 or more home runs. Andre was a member of both the 1981 N.L. East Champion Montreal Expos and the 1989 N.L. East Champion Chicago Cubs. Dawson is now in his 13th season as a special assistant to the President of the Miami Marlins.



FERGUSON JENKINS

FERGUSON JENKINS Ferguson Jenkins played in the Major Leagues from 1965-1983. He was a 1991 inductee into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. He went 284-226 (557) with a 3.34 ERA in his career. He won the 1971 National League Cy Young Award, leading the NL in innings, wins and complete games. An NL All-Star in 1967, 1971 and 1972, he was a 20-game winner seven times. His 2,038 career strikeouts are the most in Cubs history.





AMOS OTIS - DIAMOND CLINIC - 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM

AMOS OTIS Amos Otis was a 17-year outfielder with the New York Mets (1967, 1969), the Kansas City Royals (1970-83) and the Pittsburgh Pirates (1987). Otis was a five-time American League All-Star (1970-73, 1976) with the Royals. He finished among the top 10 in A.L. Most Valuable Player balloting four times in his career. Otis was a career .277 hitter with 193 home runs, 1,007 RBI and 341 stolen bases. His 52 steals in 1971 led the A.L., and he twice led the league in doubles. Otis set career-highs with 26 home runs in 1973 and with 96 RBI in 1978. The outfielder was a three-time Gold Glover.



JOE AZCUE - Q&A SESSION - 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Joe Azcue played 11 seasons in the Major Leagues with the Cincinnati Reds (1960), Kansas City Athletics (1962-63), Cleveland Indians (1963-69), Boston Red Sox (1969), California Angels (1969-70, 72) and Milwaukee Brewers (1972). The Cuban-born catcher posted career-highs in 1963 with a .281 batting average, 14 home runs, 46 RBI, 16 doubles and a .460 slugging percentage in just 96 games played. Azcue was selected to his lone All-Star Game in 1968, when he recorded a career-best 100 hits in 357 at-bats over 115 games played. "The Immortal Azcue" led all A.L. catchers in fielding percentage in 1967 (.999) and 1968 (.996). Joe, who ended his career with 50 home runs and 304 RBI in 909 career games, caught two no-hitters during his career: Sonny Siebert in 1966 and Clyde Wright in 1970.



DIEGO SEGUI - Q&A SESSION - 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM

DIEGO SEGUI Diego Segui was a 15-year Major League pitcher, with the Kansas City Athletics (1962-1965, 1967), the Washington Senators (1966), the Oakland Athletics (1968, 1970-1972), the Seattle Pilots (1969), the St. Louis Cardinals (1972-1973), the Boston Red Sox (1974-1975) and the Seattle Mariners (1977). The forkball specialist posted a career record of 92-111 and a 3.81 ERA in 639 games, including 171 starts. He posted a Major League-best 2.56 ERA for the A's in 1970. Segui pitched for both of the Seattle's Major League franchises, the Pilots and the Mariners, in their inaugural games. Segui, a native of Cuba, is the father of longtime Major League first baseman David Segui.



TOM "FLASH" GORDON

Tom Right-handed pitcher Tom Gordon played 21 seasons in the Majors, for the Kansas City Royals (1988-95), Boston Red Sox (1996-99), Chicago Cubs (2001-02), Houston Astros (2002), Chicago White Sox (2003), New York Yankees (2004-05), Philadelphia Phillies (2006-08) and Arizona Diamondbacks (2009). In his first 10 Major League seasons, "Flash" started 203 of the 350 games that he appeared in, highlighted by a 17-9 mark for the Royals in 1989, when he finished second in A.L. Rookie of the Year voting. The three-time All-Star (1998, 2004, 2006) converted 158 career saves, including a career-best and American League-leading 46 saves in 1998 in his first full season as a reliever. The 46 successful conversions still stands as a Red Sox franchise record for a single season. Gordon, the father of current Los Angeles Dodgers shortstop Dee Gordon, finished his career with a record of 138-126 with a 3.96 ERA in 890 games.



SUNDAY, JULY 8TH 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

AMOS OTIS

AMOS OTIS Amos Otis was a 17-year outfielder with the New York Mets (1967, 1969), the Kansas City Royals (1970-83) and the Pittsburgh Pirates (1987). Otis was a five-time American League All-Star (1970-73, 1976) with the Royals. He finished among the top 10 in A.L. Most Valuable Player balloting four times in his career. Otis was a career .277 hitter with 193 home runs, 1,007 RBI and 341 stolen bases. His 52 steals in 1971 led the A.L., and he twice led the league in doubles. Otis set career-highs with 26 home runs in 1973 and with 96 RBI in 1978. The outfielder was a three-time Gold Glover.



BRIAN MCRAE - DIAMOND CLINIC - 5:00 PM - 5:30 PM

BRIAN MCRAE Brian McRae was a 10-year Major League outfielder with the Kansas City Royals (1990-94), the Chicago Cubs (1995-97), the New York Mets (1997-99), the Colorado Rockies (1999) and the Toronto Blue Jays (1999). The switch-hitter was a .261 career hitter with 103 home runs, 532 RBI and 196 stolen bases. He scored a career-high 111 runs with the Cubs in 1996, and he set career-bests with 21 home runs, 79 RBI and 80 walks with the Mets in 1998. McRae, a strong defensive outfielder, played for his father, Hal, who led the Royals from 1991-1994.



DENNIS LEONARD - Q&A SESSION - 5:00 PM - 5:30 PM

DENNIS LEONARD Dennis Leonard spent his entire 12-year Major League career as a pitcher with the Kansas City Royals, from 1974-1986. He went 144-106 (.576) in his career with a 3.70 ERA. The right-hander was a three-time 20-game winner (1977-78, 1980), all of which came during a streak of eight consecutive years of 10 or more wins. The durable hurler finished fourth in American League Cy Young Award balloting in 1977, when he went 20-12 with a 3.04 ERA and 21 complete games in his 37 starts. Leonard led the A.L. in starts three times in a span of four years (1978, 1980-81), and more than one-third of his 302 career starts went for complete games (103). The New York native pitched in five Postseasons for the Royals.



SUNDAY, JULY 8TH 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

DENNIS LEONARD

DENNIS LEONARD Dennis Leonard spent his entire 12-year Major League career as a pitcher with the Kansas City Royals, from 1974-1986. He went 144-106 (.576) in his career with a 3.70 ERA. The right-hander was a three-time 20-game winner (1977-78, 1980), all of which came during a streak of eight consecutive years of 10 or more wins. The durable hurler finished fourth in American League Cy Young Award balloting in 1977, when he went 20-12 with a 3.04 ERA and 21 complete games in his 37 starts. Leonard led the A.L. in starts three times in a span of four years (1978, 1980-81), and more than one-third of his 302 career starts went for complete games (103). The New York native pitched in five Postseasons for the Royals.



BRIAN MCRAE

BRIAN MCRAE Brian McRae was a 10-year Major League outfielder with the Kansas City Royals (1990-94), the Chicago Cubs (1995-97), the New York Mets (1997-99), the Colorado Rockies (1999) and the Toronto Blue Jays (1999). The switch-hitter was a .261 career hitter with 103 home runs, 532 RBI and 196 stolen bases. He scored a career-high 111 runs with the Cubs in 1996, and he set career-bests with 21 home runs, 79 RBI and 80 walks with the Mets in 1998. McRae, a strong defensive outfielder, played for his father, Hal, who led the Royals from 1991-1994.



MONDAY, JULY 9TH - 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

ART PENNINGTON - Q&A Session - 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Art Pennington Art Pennington was an outfielder/first baseman in the Negro Leagues with the Chicago American Giants (1940-46, 1950) and the Pittsburgh Crawfords (1946). In addition, Pennington played in the Mexican League from 1946-50 and played in the Minor Leagues from 1951-59 following the breakup of the Negro Leagues. In his eight seasons in the Negro Leagues, "Superman" compiled a lifetime batting average of .336 along with two selections to the East-West All-Star Game. Pennington posted his best all-around season in 1945, hitting .359 with a .500 slugging percentage while leading the league with 16 doubles, tied for second with Jackie Robinson with five homers and finishing fourth in the league in average.



ERNEST JOHNSON - Q&A SESSION - 11:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Ernest Johnson He possessed a three-pitch repertory, consisting of an average fastball and curve and a fair change-up. As a batter he was a free-swinger with some extra-base power, and in 1950 he was used in the outfield. He continued with the Monarchs through 1953, although the Negro American League was no longer of major-league caliber, and when he went into organized baseball, it was as an outfielder. In three seasons in the Western League (with Des Moines the first two years and Sioux City the latter year), he hit .320, .300, and .308. He finished his career by hitting .265 with Charleston in the Sally League in 1959.



JESSE ROGERS JR.

Jesse Rogers Jr. Jesse Rogers, Jr. was a catcher and outfielder for the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues from 1953-54. Following his two seasons with the Monarchs, "Mr. Long Ball" signed with the New York Giants and played two seasons in their Minor League system. He was later signed by his former Kansas City manager, Buck O'Neil, to play in the Minors for the Chicago Cubs from 1958-60. During his career, Jesse played alongside Hall of Famers Lou Brock, Willard Brown, Orlando Cepeda and Billy Williams. Jesse serves as an ambassador for the Negro Leagues Museum in Kansas City, where he still resides.



ULYSSES HOLLIMON

Ulysses Hollimon Ulysses "Slim" Hollimon pitched for the Birmingham Black Barons and the Baltimore Elite Giants of the Negro Leagues from 1948-1956. The curveball pitcher took the mound in the 1951 East-West All-Star game at Comiskey Park in Chicago and also laced a double in that game. He was a member of a farm team of the St. Louis Cardinals and he also played semi-pro baseball. Hollimon served in the U.S. Navy, attended Tennessee A&I College and worked for the Ford Motor Company for more than three decades. Hollimon, a friend of the late Buck O'Neil, coached Little League for several years in Plattsburg, Missouri. Major League Baseball and the Kansas City Royals honored Hollimon during its Special Negro Leagues Draft as a part of MLB's 2008 First-Year Player Draft.



MONDAY, JULY 9TH - 11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

ART PENNINGTON

Art Pennington Art Pennington was an outfielder/first baseman in the Negro Leagues with the Chicago American Giants (1940-46, 1950) and the Pittsburgh Crawfords (1946). In addition, Pennington played in the Mexican League from 1946-50 and played in the Minor Leagues from 1951-59 following the breakup of the Negro Leagues. In his eight seasons in the Negro Leagues, "Superman" compiled a lifetime batting average of .336 along with two selections to the East-West All-Star Game. Pennington posted his best all-around season in 1945, hitting .359 with a .500 slugging percentage while leading the league with 16 doubles, tied for second with Jackie Robinson with five homers and finishing fourth in the league in average.



GEORGE ALTMAN - Autograph Session - 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

George Altman Playing with the Chicago Cubs from 1959-1962, Altman was a National League All Star in 1961 and 1962. He played with the St. Louis Cardinals and New York Mets in 1963 and 1964, respectively. Returning to Chicago in 1965, Altman remained with the Cubs franchise until 1967. In 1975, he concluded his baseball career in Japan, where he played seven years.


TONY GWYNN - Autograph Session - 11:45 PM - 12:30 PM

Tony Gwynn Tony Gwynn, a 2007 Hall of Fame inductee, spent his entire 20-year career (1982-2001) as right fielder of the San Diego Padres. Nicknamed "Mr. Padre," Gwynn was known for being one of best hitters in the game's history. Tony struck out just 434 times in 9,288 career at-bats, and never batted below .309 in any full season. The eight-time N.L. batting champion and a 15-time N.L. All-Star retired in 2001 with 3,141 career hits and a lifetime batting average of .338. Gwynn, who compiled a .306 career postseason batting average, had his uniform number 19 retired by the Padres in 2004.



TONY GWYNN - Autograph Session - 1:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Tony Gwynn Tony Gwynn, a 2007 Hall of Fame inductee, spent his entire 20-year career (1982-2001) as right fielder of the San Diego Padres. Nicknamed "Mr. Padre," Gwynn was known for being one of best hitters in the game's history. Tony struck out just 434 times in 9,288 career at-bats, and never batted below .309 in any full season. The eight-time N.L. batting champion and a 15-time N.L. All-Star retired in 2001 with 3,141 career hits and a lifetime batting average of .338. Gwynn, who compiled a .306 career postseason batting average, had his uniform number 19 retired by the Padres in 2004.



MONDAY, JULY 9TH - 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

JESSE ROGERS JR. - Q&A Session - 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Jesse Rogers Jr. Jesse Rogers, Jr. was a catcher and outfielder for the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues from 1953-54. Following his two seasons with the Monarchs, "Mr. Long Ball" signed with the New York Giants and played two seasons in their Minor League system. He was later signed by his former Kansas City manager, Buck O'Neil, to play in the Minors for the Chicago Cubs from 1958-60. During his career, Jesse played alongside Hall of Famers Lou Brock, Willard Brown, Orlando Cepeda and Billy Williams. Jesse serves as an ambassador for the Negro Leagues Museum in Kansas City, where he still resides.



ULYSSES HOLLIMON - Q&A Session - 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Ulysses Hollimon Ulysses "Slim" Hollimon pitched for the Birmingham Black Barons and the Baltimore Elite Giants of the Negro Leagues from 1948-1956. The curveball pitcher took the mound in the 1951 East-West All-Star game at Comiskey Park in Chicago and also laced a double in that game. He was a member of a farm team of the St. Louis Cardinals and he also played semi-pro baseball. Hollimon served in the U.S. Navy, attended Tennessee A&I College and worked for the Ford Motor Company for more than three decades. Hollimon, a friend of the late Buck O'Neil, coached Little League for several years in Plattsburg, Missouri. Major League Baseball and the Kansas City Royals honored Hollimon during its Special Negro Leagues Draft as a part of MLB's 2008 First-Year Player Draft.



TONY GWYNN - Autograph Session - 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Tony Gwynn Tony Gwynn, a 2007 Hall of Fame inductee, spent his entire 20-year career (1982-2001) as right fielder of the San Diego Padres. Nicknamed "Mr. Padre," Gwynn was known for being one of best hitters in the game's history. Tony struck out just 434 times in 9,288 career at-bats, and never batted below .309 in any full season. The eight-time N.L. batting champion and a 15-time N.L. All-Star retired in 2001 with 3,141 career hits and a lifetime batting average of .338. Gwynn, who compiled a .306 career postseason batting average, had his uniform number 19 retired by the Padres in 2004.



JUAN MARICHAL - AUTOGRAPH SESSION - 2:00 PM -4:00 PM

JUAN MARICHAL Juan Marichal pitched in the Major Leagues from 1960-1975. A 1983 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, he won 243 games and lost only 142 in his career with a 2.89 ERA, fanning 2,303 batters. "The Dominican Dandy" was a six-time 20-game winner for the Giants. He spun a no-hitter against Houston in 1963. A nine-time All-Star, he pitched in eight All-Star Games, hurling 14-consecutive scoreless frames over his final seven All-Star Game outings. Marichal was the Most Valuable Player in the 1965 All-Star Game after facing the minimum nine batters over his three-inning start.



ERNEST JOHNSON

Ernest Johnson He possessed a three-pitch repertory, consisting of an average fastball and curve and a fair change-up. As a batter he was a free-swinger with some extra-base power, and in 1950 he was used in the outfield. He continued with the Monarchs through 1953, although the Negro American League was no longer of major-league caliber, and when he went into organized baseball, it was as an outfielder. In three seasons in the Western League (with Des Moines the first two years and Sioux City the latter year), he hit .320, .300, and .308. He finished his career by hitting .265 with Charleston in the Sally League in 1959.



MINNIE MINOSO - Q&A Session - 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Minnie Minoso This young Cuban third baseman broke in with a .309 average for the New York Cubans in 1946 and continued his hot hitting into the next season. He was the top hitter on the team with a torrid .336 average going into August, before cooling off and finishing at .294. Minoso's offensive production from his leadoff spot in the batting order aided the Cubans as they captured the Negro National League pennant and won World Series from the Negro American League's Cleveland Buckeyes. He was the starting third baseman in both the 1947 and 1948 East-West All Star games before entering the major leagues with the Cleveland Indians in 1949. He consistently maintained a batting average of about .300, and finished his major-league career with a lifetime .298 batting average, 186 home runs, 205 stolen bases, and was hit by a pitch 189 times.



MONDAY, JULY 9TH - 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

KERRY WOOD - Autograph Session - 4:00 PM

Kerry Wood He played for the Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians and New York Yankees. Wood recorded over 200 strikeouts in four out of his first five seasons, with a high of 266 in 2003 and is the co-holder the MLB record for strikeouts in a single game (20), earning himself the nickname Kid K. He was a two-time National League All-Star and pitched in the post-season five times in a career that spanned 15 seasons.[1] Wood was the 1998 National League Rookie of the Year. Wood retired on May 18th, 2012.



MINNIE MINOSO

Minnie Minoso This young Cuban third baseman broke in with a .309 average for the New York Cubans in 1946 and continued his hot hitting into the next season. He was the top hitter on the team with a torrid .336 average going into August, before cooling off and finishing at .294. Minoso's offensive production from his leadoff spot in the batting order aided the Cubans as they captured the Negro National League pennant and won World Series from the Negro American League's Cleveland Buckeyes. He was the starting third baseman in both the 1947 and 1948 East-West All Star games before entering the major leagues with the Cleveland Indians in 1949. He consistently maintained a batting average of about .300, and finished his major-league career with a lifetime .298 batting average, 186 home runs, 205 stolen bases, and was hit by a pitch 189 times.



BOB MOTLEY - Q&A Session- 5:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Bob Motley Bob was the first African American umpire to attend the Al Somers Umpire School in Daytona Beach, Florida. At the end of his training, he earned the designation 'Outstanding Umpire.' The second year he attended, he was a top honors student. After umpire school, Bob became an umpire for the Pacific Coast League. In addition, Bob was the chief umpire for the College World Series, in Omaha, Nebraska, and for several Big Eight Tournaments.



MONDAY, JULY 9TH - 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

COOKIE ROJAS

COOKIE ROJAS Cookie Rojas played 16 seasons in the Major Leagues as a second baseman for the Cincinnati Reds (1962), Philadelphia Phillies (1963-69), St. Louis Cardinals (1969) and Kansas City Royals (1970-77). In 1965, Rojas was selected to his first of five All-Star teams as he hit a career-best .303 with 158 hits, 25 doubles and 78 runs scored for the Phillies. Cookie was named to four consecutive Midsummer Classics during his first four full seasons with the Royals from 1971-74. During the 1972 All-Star Game in Atlanta, Rojas connected on a pinch-hit, two-run home run in the eighth inning to give the American League a 3-2 lead. In 1,822 career games, Rojas hit .263 and collected 1,660 hits, including 254 doubles, 25 triples, 54 home runs and 593 RBI.



BOB MOTLEY

Bob Motley Bob was the first African American umpire to attend the Al Somers Umpire School in Daytona Beach, Florida. At the end of his training, he earned the designation 'Outstanding Umpire.' The second year he attended, he was a top honors student. After umpire school, Bob became an umpire for the Pacific Coast League. In addition, Bob was the chief umpire for the College World Series, in Omaha, Nebraska, and for several Big Eight Tournaments.



TUESDAY, JULY 10TH 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

ALEX GORDON - AUTOGRAPH SESSION - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

ALEX GORDON Gordon was drafted in 2005 by the Kansas City Royals with the second pick overall. He hit 29 home runs and stole more than 20 bases with an OPS over 1.000 in his first full season in minor league baseball with the Double-A Wichita Wranglers. He was generally regarded as one of the best hitting prospects in baseball playing in the Texas League All-Star game and was selected for the 2006 All-Star Futures Game. In 2011, he led all major league outfielders in assists, with 20. On November 1, 2011 it was announced that Alex had won his first American League Gold Glove for left fielder.



GAYLORD PERRY

GAYLORD PERRY Gaylord Perry, who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991, pitched for 22 seasons in the Major Leagues from 1962-1983. Perry, a five-time All Star, is one of five pitchers in Major League history to win the Cy Young Award in each League, capturing the award in the American League in 1972 and in the National League in 1978. In addition, he recorded five seasons of at least 20 wins en route to 314 career victories. In 1972 with the Cleveland Indians, he led the A.L. in wins, posting a 24-16 record, with an ERA of 1.92. In 1978, Perry went 21-6 with a 2.73 ERA for the San Diego Padres, leading the N.L. in wins. Gaylord and his brother, Jim (1970), are the only pair of brothers in Major League history to each win the Cy Young Award.



ROLLIE FINGERS

ROLLIE FINGERS Fingers pitched in the Major Leagues from 1968-1985 and was a key pitcher for Oakland's three straight World Series Championship teams from 1972-74. A 1992 inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, he was a seven-time All-Star and the 1981 winner of both the American League Most Valuable Player and the AL Cy Young Award after going 6-3 with a 1.04 ERA and 28 saves for the Brewers. Fingers was the Most Valuable Player of the 1974 World Series.





COOKIE ROJAS - DIAMOND CLINIC - 11:00 AM - 11:30 AM

COOKIE ROJAS Cookie Rojas played 16 seasons in the Major Leagues as a second baseman for the Cincinnati Reds (1962), Philadelphia Phillies (1963-69), St. Louis Cardinals (1969) and Kansas City Royals (1970-77). In 1965, Rojas was selected to his first of five All-Star teams as he hit a career-best .303 with 158 hits, 25 doubles and 78 runs scored for the Phillies. Cookie was named to four consecutive Midsummer Classics during his first four full seasons with the Royals from 1971-74. During the 1972 All-Star Game in Atlanta, Rojas connected on a pinch-hit, two-run home run in the eighth inning to give the American League a 3-2 lead. In 1,822 career games, Rojas hit .263 and collected 1,660 hits, including 254 doubles, 25 triples, 54 home runs and 593 RBI.



TUESDAY, JULY 10TH 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

COOKIE ROJAS

COOKIE ROJAS Cookie Rojas played 16 seasons in the Major Leagues as a second baseman for the Cincinnati Reds (1962), Philadelphia Phillies (1963-69), St. Louis Cardinals (1969) and Kansas City Royals (1970-77). In 1965, Rojas was selected to his first of five All-Star teams as he hit a career-best .303 with 158 hits, 25 doubles and 78 runs scored for the Phillies. Cookie was named to four consecutive Midsummer Classics during his first four full seasons with the Royals from 1971-74. During the 1972 All-Star Game in Atlanta, Rojas connected on a pinch-hit, two-run home run in the eighth inning to give the American League a 3-2 lead. In 1,822 career games, Rojas hit .263 and collected 1,660 hits, including 254 doubles, 25 triples, 54 home runs and 593 RBI.



HAL MCRAE

HAL MCRAE Hal McRae was a 19-year Major League outfielder with the Cincinnati Reds (1968, 1970-72) and the Kansas City Royals (1973-87). He was a career .290 hitter with 191 home runs and 1,097 RBI. Hal was a three-time American League All-Star (1975-76, 1982). In 1976, Hal led the A.L. with a .407 on-base percentage. In 1982, he posted career-highs with 27 home runs and a Major League-best 133 RBI. Hal was a part of Kansas City's 1985 World Championship season, batting .259 with 14 homers and 70 RBI, and he played in nine Postseasons overall, compiling a .400 batting average (19-45) in World Series play. Hal managed in the Major Leagues for parts of six seasons, with the Royals (1991-94) and the Tampa Bay Devil Rays (2001-02). The Royals posted a record of 84-78 under his guidance in 1993. Hal's son, longtime Major League outfielder Brian McRae, played for him with the Royals from 1991-1994.



HAL MCRAE - 1:00 PM - 1:30 PM

HAL MCRAE Hal McRae was a 19-year Major League outfielder with the Cincinnati Reds (1968, 1970-72) and the Kansas City Royals (1973-87). He was a career .290 hitter with 191 home runs and 1,097 RBI. Hal was a three-time American League All-Star (1975-76, 1982). In 1976, Hal led the A.L. with a .407 on-base percentage. In 1982, he posted career-highs with 27 home runs and a Major League-best 133 RBI. Hal was a part of Kansas City's 1985 World Championship season, batting .259 with 14 homers and 70 RBI, and he played in nine Postseasons overall, compiling a .400 batting average (19-45) in World Series play. Hal managed in the Major Leagues for parts of six seasons, with the Royals (1991-94) and the Tampa Bay Devil Rays (2001-02). The Royals posted a record of 84-78 under his guidance in 1993. Hal's son, longtime Major League outfielder Brian McRae, played for him with the Royals from 1991-1994.



FRED PATEK - AUTOGRAPH SESSION 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

FRED PATEK Fred Patek was a 14-year Major League shortstop with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1968-70), the Kansas City Royals (1971-79) and the California Angels (1980-81). He made three American League All-Star teams (1972, 1976, 1978) with the Royals. In 1971, Freddie finished sixth in A.L. Most Valuable Player balloting after posting 21 doubles, 11 triples, 49 stolen bases and 86 runs scored. His 53 steals in 1977 led the A.L. He was a .242 career hitter with 41 home runs, 490 RBI and 385 stolen bases. He played in four Postseasons in the '70s, including three with the Royals from 1976-78. Patek batted .306 (15-49) with 11 RBI in American League Championship Series play in his career.